Gettin’ Seedy at the Heritage Harvest Festival

mmushroomsMr. Cheese and I were in attendance yesterday, at the 4th annual Heritage Harvest Festival at Monticello.  We were giddy like kids when we arrived on the grounds and saw the lavish garden beds and tents promising organic 

Tossing the Swiss at Monticello

Tossing the Swiss at Monticello

this and fresh pressed that.  As noted in the program welcome note, the festival “celebrates the tangible connection between Thomas Jefferson’s legacy in food, wine and gardening and how it is a model for lovers of the earth today.”   

There were lectures about mushroom cultivation, sustainable urban gardening and even bread making. 

   pollinators 

 We were was fascinated by the bee pollinator exhibit and the bee keeper explained the hierarchy to us while she tried desperately to locate the queen, which she’d hand-marked herself with a blue dot, for quicker identification.   dairy propaganda
 
I wanted to attend the seed exchange but it was the most crowded area of all and I’m not a fan of being around so many people that I get bumped around.   Some of the lecturers, booths or displays were a bit perplexing, although they did have an audience.  The Weston A. Price Foundation was there with a plethora of booklets speaking of how soy is horrible to your health, real butter a better choice than margarine and whose objectives include truth in labeling and non-toxic farming.    Although I am not a proponent of every issue they address, I plan to read up on them a bit more. 
 
mmore 'smrooms

  

  

We walked the flower and vegetable gardens and marveled in the work it must take to keep up with it all.  We toured some of the dependencies and visited one of the kitchen areas the slaves would have used.  In checking out the cook’s room, Mr. Cheese marveled at how it was a pretty nice room for the cook until he read the board stating that the cook was married and had  7 kids and they all lived in that room, together.   the kitchen 

on recipes and cookbooks 

  

  

  

  

  

We found what must have been the World’s Biggest Tree Trunk, bought the best white wine vinegar (ever!) and reveled in the gorgeous weather and the feeling of community that the festival seemed the provide.  Every direction we turned, people were talking about locally grown food, farming and the earth.  Music sounded in the background by various folk bands, as well as a couple of violinists standing at the top of the hill by the gardens.  My mind was spinning circles around recipe ideas and I originally went there in search of parsnips for a dish I’ll put up here in a week or so.  I came home with three huge tomatoes, two red and one green.  One of the red was promptly chopped and is sitting in the chili that’s on the stove now and the green one will be fried up, likely Wednesday this week, to be had with homemade roumelade.   Those recipes  and more new inspirations, will be tried and posted.  Peace.  

big tree stumplime tree 

pathway 

happy

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About tossingtheswissaround

I have been obsessed with food since I can remember. I grew up watching the Frugal Gourmet and Julia Childs in black and white repeats on TV. I made an elementary version of veal parmesan when I was all of 8 years old and even concocted a homemade version of vomit to drizzle along the hallway and oh-so-carefully in the bathroom so I could get of school whenever I wanted. Dad never caught on but I eventually came clean about that vomit recipe. About two years ago. My skills have greatly improved and my obsession has only deepened as the years go by. In the mornings, I ask my co-workers what’s for lunch, what they ate last night and what is on the menu tonight. I groan when I eat almost anything I like because I can barely contain my excitement. Because, well, because it’s food! I was technically trained and once worked as a formal chef but physically that takes its toll so I joined the much less strenuous, albeit entertaining, world of HR. Food is still at the forefront of my mind as I continue to cook and love all things food. Enjoy!
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One Response to Gettin’ Seedy at the Heritage Harvest Festival

  1. roxanne says:

    You look wonderful!

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